Posted by: Stan Russell | June 2, 2017

Welcome Back to Big Sur – We are Open!

Pinned Post – scroll down to see latest posts.

We would like to accentuate and highlight that most businesses in Big Sur are OPEN, including Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park which reopened mid-May. Aside from Andrew Molera State Park, ALL businesses between Carmel and Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park are OPEN! This is the area with the highest concentration of businesses in the Big Sur valley, alongside the Big Sur river. The attention on the landslides in the southern area of Big Sur has created some confusion as to what Big Sur businesses are open.

Businesses located south of Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge are more difficult to reach and must be accessed on Highway 1 via Nacimiento-Ferguson Road, or by helicopter in the case of Post Ranch Inn who is shuttling their guests from Monterey. Businesses south of Ragged Point can be accessed on Highway 1 by way of San Simeon, including Hearst Castle and Ragged Point Inn.

For our purposes here we are listing businesses as North and South of Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge. Read More…

NEWS RELEASE

Los Padres National Forest
For Immediate Release

Contact: Andrew Madsen (805) 961-5759
Twitter: @LosPadresNF

Website: www.fs.usda.gov/lpnf

Los Padres Prohibits Camping Along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road

GOLETA, Calif., August 11, 2017– Los Padres National Forest officials today announced that dispersed camping along the Nacimiento-Fergusson Road (Forest Road No. 22S01) on the Monterey Ranger District is prohibited under a new Forest Order. This prohibition is effective immediately, and will be strictly enforced due to public health and safety concerns.

This Forest Order will remain in effect through August 10, 2018, and violations of the Order are punishable by a fine of $5,000 and/or six months in jail.

The recent closures on State Highway 1 due to storm-related slides, along with the failure of the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, have led to concentrated public camping use along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road. The volume of dispersed, roadside camping along the Nacimiento-Fergusson Road has significantly increased to the point where the public are placing tents and recreational vehicles in pull-outs designed for vehicles to allow oncoming traffic to safely pass. Visitors will often use their vehicles to protect their sites at night, which partially obstructs the roadway, causing traffic and camping conflicts and related public safety concerns.

The Forest Order extends along the right-of-way of Nacimiento-Fergusson Road from State Highway 1 west to mile post 10.3. Dispersed camping is prohibited within a 300-foot buffer that extends from the road’s center line.

Visitors are reminded that Los Padres is currently in Level III fire restrictions, under which recreational target shooting and dispersed campfires outside of established campgrounds are not permitted.

For more information, please contact the Monterey District Office at (831) 385-5434.

Map of camping ban along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road

Posted by: Stan Russell | August 11, 2017

Los Padres Prohibits Camping Along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road

NEWS RELEASE

Los Padres National Forest
For Immediate Release

Contact: Andrew Madsen (805) 961-5759
Twitter: @LosPadresNF

Website: www.fs.usda.gov/lpnf

Los Padres Prohibits Camping Along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road

GOLETA, Calif., August 11, 2017– Los Padres National Forest officials today announced that dispersed camping along the Nacimiento-Fergusson Road (Forest Road No. 22S01) on the Monterey Ranger District is prohibited under a new Forest Order. This prohibition is effective immediately, and will be strictly enforced due to public health and safety concerns.

This Forest Order will remain in effect through August 10, 2018, and violations of the Order are punishable by a fine of $5,000 and/or six months in jail.

The recent closures on State Highway 1 due to storm-related slides, along with the failure of the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, have led to concentrated public camping use along Nacimiento-Fergusson Road. The volume of dispersed, roadside camping along the Nacimiento-Fergusson Road has significantly increased to the point where the public are placing tents and recreational vehicles in pull-outs designed for vehicles to allow oncoming traffic to safely pass. Visitors will often use their vehicles to protect their sites at night, which partially obstructs the roadway, causing traffic and camping conflicts and related public safety concerns.

The Forest Order extends along the right-of-way of Nacimiento-Fergusson Road from State Highway 1 west to mile post 10.3. Dispersed camping is prohibited within a 300-foot buffer that extends from the road’s center line.

Visitors are reminded that Los Padres is currently in Level III fire restrictions, under which recreational target shooting and dispersed campfires outside of established campgrounds are not permitted.

For more information, please contact the Monterey District Office at (831) 385-5434.

Posted by: Stan Russell | August 10, 2017

Camping banned on Nacimiento-Fergusson Road Effective Today

Hello Big Sur!

FYI

This has been a long time coming and today, August 10, 2017, Merv George Jr., Forest Supervisor, Los Padres National Forest issued a camping ban for roadside camping on Nacimiento-Fergusson Road.

VENTANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: August 10, 2017

Contact: Kelly Sorenson, 831-800-7420

“CONDOR MILESTONE ACHIEVED- SECOND GENERATION OF CONDORS NESTING IN THE WILD IN CALIFORNIA”

Ventana Wildlife Society biologists have confirmed a nest by a pair of second generation wild-hatched California Condors, marking a major milestone for the California Condor Recovery Program. The last time a “wild-born” pair of condors nested in the wild in California was in 1985.

Condor #538, aka Miracle, was hatched in the wild in Central California in 2009 and her mate, Condor #574, aka Nomad, was wild born in 2010. Both are the wild offspring of captive-born condors that were released in Central California. This second-generation pair established a territory last year and biologists were anxiously anticipating a nest attempt this year. On July 6, 2017, VWS biologists successfully located the nest on the Big Sur coast and confirmed the presence of a two-month old condor chick (#892). The nest is in a large, hollowed-out cavity in an older growth coastal redwood, a favorite nest choice for the coastal flock. The cavity is approximately halfway up the redwood tree, about 70 feet off the ground in a steep coastal canyon. Biologists observed the mother, Miracle, fly in and feed the chick inside the cavity.

The nest cavity was formed by a wildfire that left a sizable space for the chick to wing flap and stretch. Condors also nest in caves, but fire-carved cavities in Redwoods like this one are the most common on the coast. The chick is over three months old and weighs over 10 pounds. Condor chicks typically leave the nest (or fledge) when 6-7 months old.

Since condors began nesting in 2001, over 60 chicks were produced in the wild in southern and central California combined. “It is exciting that the next generation of condors are beginning to nest in the wild and even more exciting for the people who have worked so long to achieve this goal such as my dedicated staff”, said executive director Kelly Sorenson.

Lead poisoning from ingestion of spent lead ammunition is still the leading survival threat to condors. In 2008, the use of lead ammunition was prohibited in the condor range in California to enable the condor’s recovery to the wild and the State of California will implement a complete Statewide ban on the taking of all wildlife with lead ammunition by July 2019. Additionally, Ventana Wildlife Society conducts the state’s only free nonlead ammunition giveaway program to help hunters and ranchers switch away from lead ammunition. Since 2012, over 4,500 boxes of nonlead ammunition were given away in the condor range also benefitting the wild flock.

“The ultimate goal of the recovery program is the establishment of a reproductively self-sustaining population of wild condors”, said Steve Kirkland, U.S. Fish and Wildife Service Condor Field Coordinator, “The fact that we are beginning to see wild hatched chicks reach breeding age and successfully hatch their own chicks in the wild is another positive step toward this goal. The birds know what to do. Now it’s matter of reducing the amount of spent lead ammunition in the food chain. The use of non-lead ammunition when taking wildlife provides a beneficial food source for California condors, golden eagles and other scavenging species, instead of one that is toxic.

Joe Burnett, Condor Program Manager said “I watched Miracle and Nomad grow up over the years (like my own kids) and always hoped they would pair up and nest. Seeing their chick firsthand was truly an incredible sight and was so great to see the flock come full circle.”

Significant condor conservation milestones:

• 1602 – First recorded condor sighting by a European, Father Antonio de la Ascension, in Monterey Bay.

• 1805 – Lewis and Clark report sighting a condor, calling it “beautiful buzzard of the Columbia”.

• 1939 – National Audubon Society researcher Carl Koford begins landmark field studies. Koford estimates 60-100 condors remain in the wild.

• 1967 – California Condor is included in the first federal list of U.S. endangered species.

• 1979 – 25-35 California Condors remain in the wild. Cooperative California Condor Conservation Program is formed.

• 1982 – Only 22 California Condors remain in the wild.

• 1983 – First successful hatching for a wild California Condor egg in captivity.

• 1987 – Last wild California Condor taken into captivity. Only 27 condors remain in captive breeding facilities at Los Angeles Zoo and San Diego Wild Animal Park.

• 1988 – First successful breeding of captive California Condors at the San Diego Zoo.

• 1992 – Two captive-bred California Condors reintroduced into the wild, accompanied by two Andean condors

• 1997 – Releases begin in Monterey County by Ventana Wildlife Society

• 2002 – First chick born in the wild successfully fledges in Ventura County. Condors are released in Baja California.

• 2003 – Condors are released at Pinnacles National Monument, San Benito County, California.

• 2006 – First nesting attempt for the re-introduced flock in Big Sur. The nest fails and eggshell fragments recovered are found to be thin. Condors in this flock observed feeding on a Gray Whale carcass for the first time in over 200 years.

• 2008 – First chick from a wild-laid egg fledges in the wild in Big Sur and survives, two additional chicks from captive-laid eggs fledge and one survives. The number of free-flying condors exceeds the number in captivity for first time in over 20 years. The use of lead bullets is prohibited in condor range.

• 2009 – First nest in San Benito County. In central California, 4 chicks successfully fledge in the wild and survive (one from a wild-laid egg and three from captive-laid eggs).

• 2013 – Assembly Bill 711 is passed requiring the use of non-lead ammunition when taking wildlife throughout California. A difficult year for the central California population, due to the deaths of several more condors and reproductive failure at all local nests. The central California population dips to 61 birds, and the global population is 217 birds in the wild and 203 in captivity (as of September).

• By December 31, 2016 a total of 72 confirmed condor deaths attributed to lead toxicosis since 1984.

• First second generation wild-hatched condors raising a chick in the wild since 1985 in California. Total wild population is 276 free-flying condors.

***

Ventana Wildlife Society (Founded in 1977): In California alone there are 130 species of animals in the wild threatened or endangered with extinction. Ventana Wildlife Society is committed to conserving native wildlife and their habitats. Ventana Wildlife Society released 66 Bald Eagles to central California in the 1980’s and 90’s and began reintroducing California Condors in 1997. Rather than dwelling on past mistakes that brought many of our wild animals to the brink, we focus on the present. We recover individual species and track the populations of many others so that conservation can be timely as well as effective. Focusing on youth education, we better ensure that future generations have the willingness and capacity to help wildlife. Our vision is to have a society who cares for and supports wildlife across the planet, particularly in California.

Additional information Online:

http://www.ventanaws.org

http://www.huntingwithnonlead.org/

https://www.fws.gov/cno/es/CalCondor/Condor.cfm

Posted by: Stan Russell | August 7, 2017

HIGHWAY 1 UPDATE – Monday, August 7

HIGHWAY 1 UPDATE – Monday, August 7:

Highway 1 in Monterey County continues to provide 35 total miles of Hwy. 1 to the public from south of Gorda (PM 10) to just south of Pfeiffer Canyon (PM 45.5), accessible only via Nacimiento-Fergusson Road. State Route 1 remains closed from north of Salmon (just south of the Ranger Station (PM 3) to just south of Gorda (PM 10) due to the Mud Creek event. State Route 1 south of Salmon Creek is accessible via State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo County, past Ragged Point to Salmon Creek.

REMINDER: travelers CANNOT go all the way on Hwy 1 but local businesses are open on both sides of the closure points at Pfeiffer Canyon and Salmon Creek.

Mud Creek (PM 8.9)

Mud Creek had a major slide on Saturday, May 20, 2017, losing 5 million cubic yards of material. Geotechnical and radar assessments continue at the site, with a Caltrans plan to realign the existing terrain announced last week. A tentative cost and timeline is targeted to be announced at the end of August. Roadway remains impassable.

Paul’s Slide (PM 21.6)

Paul’s Slide continues to provide access to the public 24/7, with one-way reversing traffic control with flaggers.

Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge [PCB] (PM 45.52)

· Last girders continue to be trucked to the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge construction site from near Stockton this week with girder assembly taking place in preparation for the bridge launching over the canyon.

· Public access is still on schedule for mid-to-late September.

Caltrans reminds motorists to move over and slow down when driving through highway work zones.

For more information on this project and for traffic updates on other Caltrans projects in Monterey County, residents can call the District 5 toll freenumber at 1-831-423-0396 or can visit our website at: http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist05/paffairs/release.htm#mon

Susana Z. Cruz

Caltrans District 5

Public Information Officer

Portavoz de Relaciones Públicas

para Caltrans en el Distrito 5

805.549.3138

805.549.3326–fax

Follow us on Facebook

We welcome your feedback: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RNBZG55

Mud Creek (PM 8.9) Construction of the seatrain rock fall barrier is complete; construction of the rock revetment continues at the north beach, which will protect the fill below the new highway alignment. Work on the northern cut above the north beach is halted until the rock revetment work is completed

Mud Creek (PM 8.9) Construction of the seatrain rock fall barrier is complete; construction of the rock revetment continues at the north beach, which will protect the fill below the new highway alignment. Work on the northern cut above the north beach is halted until the rock revetment work is completed

Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge (PM 45.52) Girder delivery and assembly in preparation for the launching

Join Us at Point Sur Lightstation for Moonlight Tours
Monday, August 7 & Tuesday August 8, 7:15PM
Come early!

Posted by: Stan Russell | August 4, 2017

Local Charities Benefit from 2017 Big Sur Marathon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 3, 2017
Contact:
Julie Armstrong, Marketing Communications Director
831-625-6226 / Julie

Local Charities Benefit from 2017 Big Sur Marathon

87 Groups Honored at Annual Grant Reception

The Big Sur International Marathon distributed more than a quarter million dollars in grants to 87 organizations on the Monterey Peninsula and Big Sur at a reception Monday evening in Monterey.

Scout groups, youth and arts organizations, community service groups and schools were among the many beneficiaries receiving funding from the 32nd annual Big Sur International Marathon held in April. Overall, $265,000 was distributed to 87 groups (see list below). Since its inaugural event in 1986, the Big Sur International Marathon organization has distributed more than $5 million in grants, primarily to organizations that have helped stage both the full and half marathons events.

“We’re incredibly indebted to these groups that help us stage our world class marathon,” said Tom Rolander, board chair of the Big Sur Marathon Foundation. “Our mission statement includes giving back to the community which we’re able to do thanks to these committed volunteer organizations.”

In addition to supporting local groups, the marathon is also a vehicle to assist charitable organizations in their own fund raising efforts. Individuals sign up to run the Big Sur race while obtaining sponsors for their cause. Several hundred thousand dollars were raised to benefit 15 national and regional charities from participation in April’s Big Sur International Marathon.

The Big Sur Marathon Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization funded primarily by race registrations, sponsor contributions, and individual donations.

This year’s locally-based grant recipients are included below.

American Red Cross
Apple Pie School
Aria
Big Sur – Friends of the Library
Big Sur Charter School
Big Sur Grange
Big Sur Health Center
Big Sur Historical Society
Big Sur Learning Project/Stage Kids
Big Sur Unified School District
Big Sur Volunteer Fire Brigade
Boosters at Rising Star
Calif Nursing Students Assoc of MPC
Captain Cooper School Parent Club
Carmel High School Track and Field
Carmel Host Lion Club
Central Coast Lighthouse Keepers
CERV Monterey
Child Abuse Prev. Council, Mont Health
Community Partnership for Youth
Del Rey Woods PTA
Delta Omega Rho
DMWR BOSS
Fairview 4-H
FN MOC Fleet Numerical
Friends of Monterey Public Library
Fury Fastpitch (formerly Central Coast Fury)
Girl Scout Artemis Leadership Camp
Girl Scout Destination
Girl Scout Troop 30609
Girls Inc. of Central Coast (Seaside High)
Hartnell College Physics Club
Henry Miller Memorial Library
International School
Japanese Language School
Junior League of Monterey County
Junipero Serra School – Washington Program
Juvenile Impact Program
Kinship Support Unlimited
Kiwanis Club of Pacific Grove
Knights of Columbus Council 4593
La Mesa PTA
MAOS: Monterey Academy of Oceanographic Science
Marina High Honor Society
Marina High School Cross Country
Marina High School Link Crew
Mid-Coast Fire Brigade
Middlebury Institute (MIIS)
Mission Trail Lions of Carmel
Monterey Bay Gymnastics Assoc.
Monterey County Assn of Realtors
Monterey County Habitat for Humanity
Monterey High Cross Country Boosters
Monterey High Wrestling Club
Monterey Peninsula Dental
Monterey Peninsula Voices
MPC Alpha Gamma Sigma
MPC Children’s Center
Naval Postgraduate School Cycling Club
Navy Supply Corps Foundation Monterey Chapter
Old Capitol Lions Club
P.G. Middle School Staff
Pacific Grove Music Boosters
PGHS Breaker Girls
PGHS Lacrosse (payable to PG Kiwanis)
PGHS Spanish Club
PGHS Track & Field
PGHS Wrestlers
Return of the Natives
Rho-Kappa Chapter of Kappa Sigma
Robert Down School PTA
Saint Mary’s Youth Group
San Carlos School
Santa Catalina School
Seaside Dolphins Aquatic Club
Seaside High Cross Country
Seaside High Girls Softball
SPARC Academy
Troop 127 Boy Scouts of America
Troop 2, Boy Scouts of America
Troop 43, Boy Scouts of America
Troop 60, Boy Scouts of America
Troop 90, Boy Scouts of America
UnChained
Ventana Wildlife Society
White Stag Leadership
York School


Big Sur Marathon board members Alice Crawford and Tom Rolander pose with representatives from Boy Scout Troop 43, one of 87 groups honored at the marathon’s annual grant distribution reception.

 

Posted by: Stan Russell | August 3, 2017

State Park Activities at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park

State Park Activities
*Park Day use fees apply for nature walks and activities.

All programs meet at the Campfire Center.

Thursday, August 3rd

8:00 p.m. Special Campfire Presentation: “California Condors”

Joe Burnett, Big Sur Condor program manager for the Ventana Wildlife Society, will present a fun program about California Condors and their triumphant return to the central coast. Discover the coolest facts about condors, review the latest recovery milestones achieved by the Big Sur flock hear about this year’s wild nestlings.

Friday, August 4th

8:00 p.m. “Campfire Movie Night: Wild Flyers-Defying Gravity”

Join us for a one-hour film and discover how different animal species take to the skies and defy gravity. See how some of these amazing animals have adapted to fly and how it helps them to survive.

Saturday, August 5th

10:00 a.m. JUNIOR RANGERS– ECOLOGY (children ages 7-12 only)

Come have some fun discovering habitats of Big Sur and how they are all related. Meet Park Interpreter Sara for one hour of activities and design your own poster.

11:30 a.m. Ranger Cubs: Bats (ages 6 and under)Children and parents join Park Interpreter Sara for a half hour of fun. Hear stories about why bats are important and create your own night time scene.

8:00 p.m. Campfire Program: Whale Tales Join Sara for a glimpse into the underwater world of our marine giants. Learn which whales to look for along the Big Sur Coast and find out where they are going. Bring your own s’mores fixings for roasting after the show. Wear warm clothes and bring a flashlight.

Friday, August 11th

8:00 p.m. “Campfire Movie Night: “Forces of Nature: Color”

Earth is painted in stunning colors. By understanding how these colors are created and the energy they carry, we can learn the secret language of the planet. Wear warm clothes and bring a flashlight for this one-hour film screening.

Saturday, August 12th

10:00 a.m. JUNIOR RANGERS– REDWOODS (children ages 7-12 only) Meet Sara for this one-hour program of activities and have some fun discovering our majestic California Coastal Redwoods. Find out how they grow and why they are so special.

11:30 a.m. Ranger Cubs: DRAGONFLIES (ages 6 and under) Children and parents join Park Interpreter Sara for a half hour of fun. Hear stories about how a dragonfly is born and make one to fly around the park.

8:00 p.m. Campfire Program “Discovering Park Past” Join Park Interpreter Sara for some old time music and a photo history of this park. Learn who built the campground and the about people who have called this park home for the past 84 years. Wear warm clothes and bring a flashlight for this one hour program. Bring your own s’mores if you wish to make them after the show, roasting sticks available.

Point Sur Lightstation State Historic Park Tours-

“Walking Tour into the Past” Volunteer led, three-hour walking tour on paved road. The walk is less than a mile but with a rise in elevation of 300’. Meet along the West Side of Highway 1, ¼ mile north of Pt. Sur Naval facility.* Arrive early. Tour size limited. Tours- Saturday: 10 a.m., 2 p.m., Sunday: 10 a.m., and Wednesday: 10 a.m., 2 p.m.

Admission Adult: $12.00; Ages 6-17: $5.00; Age 5 and under: free.

*Located 7 miles north of Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park on Highway 1.

Ernst Ewoldsen Nature Center- Located along the Warden’s Path on the south side of the Big Sur River is open for visitors every day from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Come discover what lives here in the park!

Molera Ranch House MuseumFind out what it was like to live in Big Sur 100 years ago? Located at Andrew Molera State Park, the Ranch House is open for visitors Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

California Condor Discovery Center: Come learn about the magnificent condors and the reintroduction program run by the Ventana Wildlife Society. The center is open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is located at Andrew Molera State Park.

Thank you for visiting Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park. Please be patient as we work to re-open areas of the park after the Soberanes Fire and winter storm damage. Buzzards Roost, Pfeiffer Falls, Valley View, Mount Manual and the Big Sur Gorge remain closed due to damages. For the latest information visit the Big Sur Station or Park Entrance kiosk. Please stay out of all closed areas and watch for falling rocks and trees in these zones.

Flyer8.3.17.pdf

Date: August 1, 2017

District: District 5 (Central Coast)

Contact: susana.cruz (bilingual) or jim.shivers

Phone: (805) 549-3138 or (805) 549-3237

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Caltrans Releases Plan for the Reopening

of Highway 1 at Mud Creek

BIG SUR, MONTEREY COUNTY – Caltrans today released plans detailing its initial strategy to expedite the rebuilding and reopening of Highway 1 at Mud Creek. Department officials announced that a new roadway will traverse over the site of the massive Mud Creek slide.

The new roadway will be realigned across the landslide and will be buttressed with a series of embankments, berms, rocks, netting, culverts and other stabilizing material according to department engineers and geologists.

“Our staff has been working hard to tackle the weather-related challenges faced by Highway 1,” said Malcolm Dougherty. “We have made tremendous progress on Pfeiffer Canyon, have opened Paul’s Slide and now we have good news on the slide at Mud Creek. Our goal is to reconnect the areas impacted by the winter storms as quickly and safely as possible.”

This strategy will allow Caltrans to rebuild the roadway more quickly and at a lower cost than other alternatives such as structures, a tunnel or major earthwork that places additional fill into the ocean.

“This plan is a win-win for the hard-hit Big Sur community and this pristine coastal environment,” added Caltrans District 5 Director Tim Gubbins. “Our emergency contractor continues working dawn to dusk every day and will continue until we can safely reopen the highway.”

Caltrans sent its initial roadway rebuilding plan to various state, local and federal resource agencies last week and will continue to work closely with them and the Big Sur community until the highway is reopened.

The landslide occurred on May 20, dumping more than 5 million cubic yards of material onto the roadway and into the ocean, making it the largest slide ever along the Big Sur coast. Caltrans’ expects having a timeline for reopening and anticipated cost details by the end of August.

A news media opportunity will take place Thursday, Aug. 3. All interested media meet at Ragged Point Inn on State Route 1 at 10 am sharp. Media is required to bring/wear safety gear: hard hat, vest, boots and safety glasses. RSVP is recommended.

–Photos below—

Photo of Mud Creek Slide from June 1, 2017

Aerial photo courtesy of John Madonna from July 17, 2017

Posted by: Stan Russell | July 31, 2017

HIGHWAY 1 UPDATE – Monday, July 31

HIGHWAY 1 UPDATE
Monday, July 31

Highway 1 in Monterey County continues to provide 35 total miles of Hwy. 1 to the public from south of Gorda (PM 10) to just south of Pfeiffer Canyon (PM 45.5), accessible only via Nacimiento-Fergusson Road. State Route 1 remains closed from north of Salmon (just south of the Ranger Station (PM 3) to just south of Gorda (PM 10) due to the Mud Creek event. State Route 1 south of Salmon Creek is accessible via State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo County, past Ragged Point to Salmon Creek.

REMINDER: travelers CANNOT go all the way on Hwy 1 but local businesses are open on both sides of the closure points at Pfeiffer Canyon and Salmon Creek.

Mud Creek (PM 8.9)
Mud Creek had a major slide on Saturday, May 20, 2017, losing 5 million cubic yards of material. Geotechnical and radar assessments continue at the site, with a Caltrans plan to rebuild to be announced this week. Roadway remains impassable.

Paul’s Slide (PM 21.6)
Paul’s Slide continues to provide access to the public 24/7, with one-way reversing traffic control with flaggers.

Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge [PCB] (PM 45.52)
· Final steel girders are being painted near Stockton, CA and initial girders are being trucked to the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge construction site as of last Friday, July 28.

· Public access is still on schedule for mid-to-late September.

Caltrans reminds motorists to move over and slow down when driving through highway work zones.

For more information on this project and for traffic updates on other Caltrans projects in Monterey County, residents can call the District 5 toll freenumber at 1-831-423-0396 or can visit our website at: http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist05/paffairs/release.htm#mon


Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge (PM 45.52) Prep work /Girder delivery and assembly.

Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge (PM 45.52) Prep work /Girder delivery and assembly.

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